FSRI, Discrimination, and Sexual Identity

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For the record:

FSRI does not discriminate based on sexual identity, gender, nationality, religion, or race.

People who are uncomfortable with this policy should find somewhere else to train.

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4 responses to “FSRI, Discrimination, and Sexual Identity

  1. Gillian Russell

    However it’s rumoured that we have strong biases in favour of strength, fitness, education, and independent thought.

  2. I may have missed it entirely, but when did anyone ever say that you DID discriminate? I think that all martial artists should accept everyone, regardless of sex, sexual orientation, nationality, race, religion, etc. After all, what good does it do martial arts to do so? We want to spread our arts across the entire world, what good does it do to say “except for you”? It’s good that you put this out there, because I think that some people tend to believe the stigmas about how martial arts are for Asian people, or that martial artists hate women. I’m also a supporter of the HRC, so it’s nice to see their logo on a martial arts blog

  3. Adam says, Seriously, I am not Mr. Karate.

    Genki Sudo says:

    WE ARE ALL ONE 🙂

  4. Hi Noah,

    I don’t think anyone has said that we discriminate on those grounds, it’s just that given

    i) the widespread discrimination in the US culture in which we’re embedded (and nearly everywhere else as well)
    ii) the history of discrimination within karate (especially on grounds of race and gender)
    iii) the popular perception of karate people as militaristic/mal-adjusted meatheads who either idolise Eastern culture or idolise a kind of fantasy masculinity that involves being fit, in control of everything, and very very hetero

    we wanted to come out and state our policy explicitly. One way to be a good ally is to break the silence occasionally – either in responding to something objectionable you heard (like a racist joke), or just making clear where you stand with say, the HRC. I guess I think there are two good consequences of such public explicitness: members of the discriminated against group learn without having to ask that our group is somewhere where they’ll be accepted and ii) our announcement does just a tiny bit more to help change the culture more generally.

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